Topics A to Z

As part of NEHA's continuos effort to provide convenient access to information and resources, we have gathered together for you the links in this section. Our mission is "to advance the environmental health and protection professional for the purpose of providing a healthful environment for all,” as well as to educate and inform those outside the profession.

Managing a multi-faceted Onsite Sewage Treatment and Disposal System (OSTDS) Operating Permit Program from inception to a statewide recognized program CAN be successfully accomplished. Like a big sandwich, take it one bite at a time using a “different and better” approach. Presenters will discuss their challenges and victories, despite tight budgets and personnel challenges. Leave equipped to enhance your own program.

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

July 2015
Additional Topics A to Z: Wastewater
Jan/Feb 2014
76.6 | 66-67
Eduardo Massad, MD, Lêuda Olívêr, Marcelo N. Burattini, Francisco A. B. Coutinho
Additional Topics A to Z: Pathogens and Outbreaks

The Soil Treatment Unit Model (STUMOD-FL-HPS) is a simple to use practical tool for evaluating fate and transport of nitrogen in onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS). This simple practical modeling tool provides OWTS professionals an opportunity to rapidly evaluate multiple scenarios in a relatively short time and aids in the selection of nitrogen reduction strategies in a given watershed. A demonstration of the modeling process using a case study will be presented, leaving the attendee with a new approach to nitrogen reduction.

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

July 2015
Additional Topics A to Z: Wastewater

Recent evidence suggests that urban refugee populations are at an increased lead poisoning risk.

This presentation will chronicle a case of lead poisoning in a 3-year old female refugee who resides on the Omaha Lead Site (OLS), an EPA Superfund site that includes approximately 16,000 residential properties covering an area of 25.7 sq mi. Assess your own response to this unique situation faced by the Douglas County Health Department. Come away with a new perspective on an everyday challenge.

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

July 2015
Additional Topics A to Z: Children's Environmental Health

Sarasota and Manatee counties lie within one regional food system in Florida. This presentation demonstrates the value in combining the resources of local county health departments in the execution of a cross-county food assessment and development of a regional food access plan. Attendees will learn how local agencies can collaborate to minimize the impact of workforce and budgetary challenges, leverage community engagement capabilities, and maximize community partner resources in addressing regional food insecurity issues.

 

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

July 2015

This presentation shares results of research conducted in various restaurants and markets of Lima, Peru. It describes the food safety regulation and inspection system in use and identifies some of the major variables and food safety risk factors at play. A brief comparison to the U.S. FDA Food Code is made, providing a discussion on possible approaches to remediation.

July 2015
Eliezer Bermudez, MS, PhD, CP-FS
Potential CE Credits: 0.50

Abstract

Childhood obesity has increased rapidly over the last three decades in the U.S. Individual-level interventions targeting healthy eating and physical activity have not significantly impacted clinical measures of obesity in children. Focusing “upstream” on physical, social, cultural, political, and economic environments may be more effective. The purpose of this qualitative review is to analyze published environmental interventions that effectively prevented or reduced obesity in children ages 2–10 years by working within their family, school, and/or community environment to increase physical activity, reduce sedentary behaviors, or improve healthy diet. Through an electronic database search, 590 original articles were identified and 33 were read in full. Using Brennan and co-authors’ (2011) rating system, 18 were rated as effective intervention studies. This analysis showed that interventions targeting multiple environments (e.g., family, school, and community) show promise in reducing childhood obesity. Further research is needed to test interventions targeting multiple environments in different communities and populations.

October 2016
October 2016
79.3 | 18-26
Claudio R. Nigg, PhD, Md Mahabub Ul Anwar, PhD, Kathryn L. Braun, DrPH, Jobel Mercado, MA
Additional Topics A to Z: Children's Environmental Health

Increasing road salt application has followed a trend of increasing chloride levels in shallow wells and a rise in chloride in the Illinois River in Peoria, IL. Much of the recharge area for the regions aquifer is located near major highways, intersections, and rural routes. During this session, we will identify the environmental health risks from increased chlorides, learn of recent developments from the snow and ice removal industry on reducing chloride contamination, and compare results of salt application from un-calibrated salt trucks with calibrated salt trucks.

July 2015
Emily Sjostrom, MS
Potential CE Credits: 0.50

With the establishment of the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) and new food safety regulations, a precedent has been set to prevent foodborne illness in India. The objective of the authors’ study was to identify knowledge gaps among food handlers in Chennai, Tamil Nadu, to establish priorities for future intervention. A 44-question survey was administered to 156 food handlers at 36 restaurants in Chennai between April and June of 2011. The overall mean knowledge score was 49% and knowledge gaps related to hand hygiene, proper food cooking and holding temperatures, and cross contamination were identified. Food handlers with a Medical Fitness Certificate scored significantly higher than those without a certificate, after controlling for food safety training and level of education (p < .05). As the FSSAI standards now require a medical certificate for restaurant licensure and registration, consideration should be given to include an educational component to this certification with an explanation of expected food safety behavior.

January 2016
January/February 2016
78.6 | 18-25
Mindi R. Manes, Paraswami Kuganantham, Murugesan Jagadeesan, M. Laxmidevi

Article Abstract

The importance of clean food contact surfaces has been recognized; however, the importance of cleanliness on nonfood contact surfaces such as menus may be underestimated. The aim of the study described in this article was to determine the cleanliness of restaurant menus, evaluate typical cleaning methods used in a restaurant, and provide recommendations for improving menu cleanliness. The authors’ study used an adenosine triphosphate meter to assess the cleanliness of the menus. A pretest identified the most commonly touched areas of the menu by consumers. Based on the results of the pretest, menus were collected from casual-family dining restaurants and analyzed for cleanliness. Results suggested that menus should be cleaned after each shift and that menus distributed by the staff when guests are seated are cleaner than those kept on the table.

June 2014
76.1 | 18-24
Jinkyung Choi, PhD, Barbara Almanza, PhD, Douglas Nelson, PhD, Jay Neal, PhD
Additional Topics A to Z: Food Safety

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