Topics A to Z

As part of NEHA's continuos effort to provide convenient access to information and resources, we have gathered together for you the links in this section. Our mission is "to advance the environmental health and protection professional for the purpose of providing a healthful environment for all,” as well as to educate and inform those outside the profession.

Abstract

Studies have shown that fecal contamination can be determined by conducting multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) analyses. The hypothesis is if bacteria exhibit resistance, they are likely to be derived from organisms exposed to antimicrobial agents. Therefore, this project seeks to apply MAR analysis to nonpoint source (NPS) and combined sewer overflow (CSO) areas along the Anacostia River in Washington, DC. Presumptive E. coli was isolated from NPS and CSO samples and tested with eight different antimicrobial agents to assess MAR indices. Isolates from CSO sources showed significantly greater resistance (p < .05) and higher MAR indices, with an average MAR index of 0.36 for CSO samples and 0.07 for NPS samples. It was also revealed that 96.9% of CSO isolates exhibited resistance, versus only 43.8% of NPS isolates. Our study on the Anacostia River using this approach clearly shows fecal coliforms are associated with CSO overflows, indicating that pollution-derived coliform levels are strongly linked to antimicrobial resistance. The implementation of this method as an index for water quality in the remediation of the Anacostia River has the ability to serve as a model and monitoring tool for the rehabilitation of urban watersheds.

October 2016
October 2016
79.3 | 36-39
Gaurav Dhiman, Emma N. Burns, David W. Morris, PhD

Public health policy targeting populations at greatest risk can be used to significantly reduce the burden of foodborne disease. This study calculated incidence rates, disability adjusted life years, and quality adjusted life years estimates for salmonellosis and campylobacteriosis, adjusted for underreporting. Investigators then looked at how these measures of disease burden can contribute to the policy debate on the public health significance of foodborne disease. Targeting food safety activities through proactive public health policy and by using underreporting estimates of reported cases of foodborne illness may raise the issue of foodborne disease in the policy agenda.

July 2015
Andrew Papadopoulos, PhD, MBA, CPHI
Potential CE Credits: 1.00

This presentation shares the Lakota Sioux experience through the view of a USPHS Team Commander who participated in a Community Health and Service Mission, designed to meet the field-based training needs of emergency response teams. During the session, there will also be a discussion of the partnership between the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS), the Lakota Sioux Tribe, and a non-government organization (Remote Area Medical). Many photos and cultural experiences will be shared to illustrate the mission.

July 2015
Joe Maloney, MPH, REHS/RS
Potential CE Credits: 1.00
Additional Topics A to Z: Hazards

As food safety professionals, we have used traditional observational inspection techniques to evaluate a food operation's procedures and training during inspections. Until now, there has not been a clear method for evaluating the verification component of an operation’s food safety systems. This session will engage you in the discovery of FBI risk factors through the use of new behavioral-based food safety interview tools. You'll compare the snapshot observational approach to the discussion/interview approach. Explore how you can integrate these techniques into your daily inspections.

 

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

 

July 2015

This study involved conducting virus monitoring on a set of representative public water supply wells and evaluating the association between source water virus occurrence and community acute gastrointestinal illness incident rates. Find out how the results help predict which sources are most likely to be contaminated and identify critical factors that contribute to the protection of drinking water sources. Come away equipped to use this assessment tool and associated strategies for implementation.

July 2015

This session uses case studies to examine the impact of building materials and particular chemicals on indoor air quality (IAQ) throughout their lifecycle. After attending this talk, environmental health professionals will be able to identify materials that might be the origin of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), identify low-emitting alternative materials, and describe the benefits and value of using sustainable building materials. Come away with a proven method for controlling volatile organic compounds in the indoor environments in your community.

July 2015
Josh Jacobs
Potential CE Credits: 0.50

Environmental Health practitioners are sometimes required to serve as a manager or coordinator of volunteers, such as those of the Medical Reserve Corps. This session will share how these specialized volunteers can support EH programs will offer a basic framework for volunteer program management within the Emergency Management Cycle. It will provide an approach for attendees to identify and formalize volunteer roles and offer resources that can support volunteer management efforts.

 

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

 

July 2015
Additional Topics A to Z: Emergency Preparedness

Orange County, California is known for its beach communities and Disneyland, however, 400,000 people and 20% of children in Orange County are food insecure. The Waste Not OC Coalition, an innovative public/private collaborative, strives to eliminate hunger and food waste by facilitating the donation of wholesome surplus food from food producing facilities to pantries with the support of health inspectors. Attendees will learn how to create similar coalitions, increase food donations, challenge food donation myths, and alleviate hunger.

 

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

 

July 2015
Additional Topics A to Z: Sustainability

Pages