Topics A to Z

As part of NEHA's continuos effort to provide convenient access to information and resources, we have gathered together for you the links in this section. Our mission is "to advance the environmental health and protection professional for the purpose of providing a healthful environment for all,” as well as to educate and inform those outside the profession.

Environmental Health practitioners are sometimes required to serve as a manager or coordinator of volunteers, such as those of the Medical Reserve Corps. This session will share how these specialized volunteers can support EH programs will offer a basic framework for volunteer program management within the Emergency Management Cycle. It will provide an approach for attendees to identify and formalize volunteer roles and offer resources that can support volunteer management efforts.

 

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

 

July 2015
Additional Topics A to Z: Emergency Preparedness

Orange County, California is known for its beach communities and Disneyland, however, 400,000 people and 20% of children in Orange County are food insecure. The Waste Not OC Coalition, an innovative public/private collaborative, strives to eliminate hunger and food waste by facilitating the donation of wholesome surplus food from food producing facilities to pantries with the support of health inspectors. Attendees will learn how to create similar coalitions, increase food donations, challenge food donation myths, and alleviate hunger.

 

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

 

July 2015
Additional Topics A to Z: Sustainability

Abstract

Waterborne outbreaks of salmonellosis are uncommon. The Tennessee Department of Health investigated a salmonellosis outbreak of 10 cases with the only common risk factor being exposure to a single splash pad. Risks included water splashed in the face at the splash pad and no free residual chlorine in the water system. We surveyed water quality and patron behaviors at splash pads statewide. Of the 29 splash pads participating in the water quality survey, 24 (83%) used a recirculating water system. Of the 24, 5 (21%) water samples were tested by polymerase chain reaction and found to be positive for E. coli, Giardia, norovirus, or Salmonella. Among 95 patrons observed, we identified common high-risk behaviors of sitting on the fountain or spray head and putting mouth to water. Water venue regulations and improved education of patrons are important to aid prevention efforts.

June 2017
June 2017
79.10 | 8-12
Joshua L. Clayton, MPH, PhD, Judy Manners, MSc, Susan Miller, MS, Craig Shepherd, MPH
Additional Topics A to Z: Recreational Waters

In 2012, the Plano, TX Mosquito Management Program (MMP) received reports of 28 human cases of West Nile Virus (WNV) related illnesses, while neighboring counties experienced over 900 combined cases during the same period. Concerned public and heavy media coverage across multiple health jurisdictions made essential the effective communication of Plano Environmental Health Department's MMP activities. This session will cover: insight on political and media relations challenges faced by local environmental health; the post-event evaluation of 2012 mitigation and communication strategies; and additions to 2013 MMP protocols, including the "Fix It Plano" app that gives residents a role in monitoring and surveillance. Attend this session and take away a fresh look at your own WNV mitigation efforts and best practices for use and communication in a public health crisis.

July 2015
Geoffrey Heinicke, MPH, RS
Potential CE Credits: 1.00

The Centers for Diseases Control has concluded that poor indoor air quality in schools can greatly impact children's respiratory health and their academic performance. An IAQ monitoring and improvement program was started in the schools of Tangipahoa Parish, Louisiana with the support of the U.S. EPA grant. This presentation will share the preliminary results of the assessments. Attendees will leave knowing the successes and challenges of implementing an IAQ program.

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

July 2015
Additional Topics A to Z: Children's Environmental Health

Who will provide you with environmental health services in the future? Our approach to increasing the number of students in our program is to tie program quality, as defined by the university, to resources need to attract students. Academicians will learn how to leverage the quality of their program to obtain resources form their University to market their programs.

 

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

July 2015
Additional Topics A to Z: Workforce Development

Drinking water from domestic wells that have not been tested for contaminants since initial construction may be a risk to health. One agency implemented a one-time Domestic Well Water Sampling program to provide well owners with free water quality analysis. Find out how the results can inform efforts to outreach and education, measure impacts of onsite wastewater treatment systems on groundwater and surface water, and be used to map constituent levels, and identify and map plumes.

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

 

July 2015

Abstract

During the summer of 2014 an outbreak of tickborne relapsing fever (TBRF) occurred in a group of high school students and staff at a youth camp, which was reported to Coconino County Public Health Services District. Six confirmed and five probable cases of TBRF occurred. During the environmental investigation two rodents tested positive for TBRF, but the vector, soft ticks, could not be found in their “normal” habitat. Ticks were finally located in areas not typical for soft ticks.

April 2016
April 2016
78.8 | 8-11
Marlene Gaither, REHS, MPH, ME, Mare Schumacher, Nathan Nieto, PhD, Jennifer Corrigan

Detecting increases in self-reported foodborne illnesses and low report rates by medical providers, Kern County Environmental Health implemented an innovative approach to enhance collaboration between Environmental Health, public health, and the medical community.

The execution of the Foodborne Illness Surveillance Guidance Training for Medical Professionals became a successful method in communicating with the medical community and improving foodborne illness surveillance. This presentation provides an overview of the workshop design, challenges, results, and next steps that you may apply within your community.

July 2015
Diana Wilson, REHS/RS; and Kimberly Hernandez, MPH
Potential CE Credits: 1.00
Additional Topics A to Z: Pathogens and Outbreaks

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