Topics A to Z

As part of NEHA's continuos effort to provide convenient access to information and resources, we have gathered together for you the links in this section. Our mission is "to advance the environmental health and protection professional for the purpose of providing a healthful environment for all,” as well as to educate and inform those outside the profession.

Chuck Lichon, R.S., M.P.H., Deputy Health Officer at District Health Department #2 in Michigan, developed a Children’s Environmental Health Power Point Program with the financial assistance of the Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI.  The Power Points are approximately 25-35 minutes in length, allowing for a presentation to be made during one classroom setting, or to be used for a community presentation, allowing time for Q & A.  Some of the topics include: Sunwise, Body Art, Household Hazardous Waste, Meth, Recreational Water, and more.  They are free to download and use for presentations in your school, health department community presentations, or for media use.  Changes in the presentations should not be made without consent from the author, and/or the NEHA Board of Directors.  

 

The Bats and Rabies PowerPoints is available via the link listed below:   

Chuck Lichon, R.S., M.P.H.
Additional Topics A to Z: Vectors and Pests

Abstract

Most populations now derive benefits as well as risks from a global economy. Local environnmetal health can be impacted positively through importation or adoption of foreign technological advances, administrative approaches, and cultural attributes, to name only a few. Similarly, risks are now commonly shared on an international scale, as illustrated by cross-border food source contamination, emerging or recognized disease spread, unchecked international pollution, and a host of other incidents in recent years. Beyond the case study, historical record of the textbook approach, affordable study abroad programs now exist to more concretely educate students about such impacts. Once considered simply a perquisite for more financially able students, or a requirement for language arts students, both short- and long-term study abroad programs increasingly add a necessary global perspective to the college environmental health graduate. This special report details the ways in which a number of accredited programs are using and integrating study abroad experiences into their curriculums to better prepare their graduates to meet the international environmental health and safety challenges of the 21st century.

 

July 2017
July/August 2017
80.1 | 30-33
Timothy J. Ryan, PhD, CIH, CSP, Ohio University
Additional Topics A to Z: Workforce Development

Abstract

Rats are a common problem in cities worldwide. Impoverished urban neighborhoods are disproportionately affected because factors associated with poverty promote rat infestations and rat–human contact. In public health, most studies have focused on disease transmission, but little is known about the nonphysical consequences of this environmental exposure. Mental health often is neglected but is receiving increasing attention in public health research and practice. The objective of this study was to use a systematic review and narrative synthesis of the published literature to explore the effect of rat exposure on mental health among residents in impoverished urban neighborhoods. Although the literature addressing this topic was sparse, the results of this review suggest that rat exposure consistently has a negative impact on mental health. These effects can be elicited directly (e.g., fear of rat bites) or indirectly (e.g., feeling of disempowerment from inability to tackle rat problems). By developing a better understanding of potential rat-related health risks, both mental and physical, public health officials can better evaluate, refine, and develop their policies regarding rats.

 

November 2018
November 2018
81.4 | 8-12
Raymond Lam, MSc, CPHI(C), School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Kaylee A. Byers, MSc, University of British Columbia, Chelsea G. Himsworth, MVetSc, DVM, Dipl ACVP, School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia

Chuck Lichon, R.S., M.P.H., Deputy Health Officer at District Health Department #2 in Michigan, developed a Children’s Environmental Health Power Point Program with the financial assistance of the Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI.  The Power Points are approximately 25-35 minutes in length, allowing for a presentation to be made during one classroom setting, or to be used for a community presentation, allowing time for Q & A.  Some of the topics include: Sunwise, Body Art, Household Hazardous Waste, Meth, Recreational Water, and more.  They are free to download and use for presentations in your school, health department community presentations, or for media use.  Changes in the presentations should not be made without consent from the author, and/or the NEHA Board of Directors.  

The Body Art PowerPoints is available via the link listed below:   

Chuck Lichon, R.S., M.P.H.
Additional Topics A to Z: General Environmental Health

Abstract

Various methodologies have been utilized in hand-hygiene (HH) research to measure the quality and compliance rates of hand washing. Some notable examples are direct observation, self-report, image quantification of fluorescence, microbial sampling, automated systems, and electronically assisted devices. While direct observation is considered the gold standard of HH monitoring systems, its methodological limitations (e.g., high staffing demands, participant reactivity, and undersampling) have yet to be overcome. As a result, there is renewed interest in developing technologies or methods of assessment that are cost-effective, accurate, and not intrusive. This article provides a brief review of HH monitoring systems while presenting a less resource-intensive methodology utilizing image analysis of fluorescence to assess hand washing. Results indicate that the proposed HH protocol could be used to replace human visual analysis of fluorescence, as well as provide a less resource-intensive option to assess HH under controlled conditions. Future implications and the need for additional research, such as cross-validating the results in a real-world clinical setting, are discussed.

June 2016
June 2016
78.10 | 14-20
Neil Deochand, MS, MA, Michelle E. Deochand, MS

This presentation will highlight the benefits of leveraging cross-disciplinary knowledge, resources, and communication channels on water quality and public health. Several examples of media coverage of water quality issues and the response from public health officials and water quality practitioners will be presented to give attendees an understanding of the perspectives of water quality and public health groups, common understandings, and technical challenges. 

Come away with techniques and recommendations to more effectively and consistently communicate with the public about water quality issues.

July 2015
Rula A. Deeb, PhD, BCEEM
Potential CE Credits: 0.50

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