Topics A to Z

As part of NEHA's continuos effort to provide convenient access to information and resources, we have gathered together for you the links in this section. Our mission is "to advance the environmental health and protection professional for the purpose of providing a healthful environment for all,” as well as to educate and inform those outside the profession.

Abstract

Various methodologies have been utilized in hand-hygiene (HH) research to measure the quality and compliance rates of hand washing. Some notable examples are direct observation, self-report, image quantification of fluorescence, microbial sampling, automated systems, and electronically assisted devices. While direct observation is considered the gold standard of HH monitoring systems, its methodological limitations (e.g., high staffing demands, participant reactivity, and undersampling) have yet to be overcome. As a result, there is renewed interest in developing technologies or methods of assessment that are cost-effective, accurate, and not intrusive. This article provides a brief review of HH monitoring systems while presenting a less resource-intensive methodology utilizing image analysis of fluorescence to assess hand washing. Results indicate that the proposed HH protocol could be used to replace human visual analysis of fluorescence, as well as provide a less resource-intensive option to assess HH under controlled conditions. Future implications and the need for additional research, such as cross-validating the results in a real-world clinical setting, are discussed.

June 2016
June 2016
78.10 | 14-20
Neil Deochand, MS, MA, Michelle E. Deochand, MS

This presentation will highlight the benefits of leveraging cross-disciplinary knowledge, resources, and communication channels on water quality and public health. Several examples of media coverage of water quality issues and the response from public health officials and water quality practitioners will be presented to give attendees an understanding of the perspectives of water quality and public health groups, common understandings, and technical challenges. 

Come away with techniques and recommendations to more effectively and consistently communicate with the public about water quality issues.

July 2015
Rula A. Deeb, PhD, BCEEM
Potential CE Credits: 0.50

The "Policy for an Integrated Food Safety System" educational track is designed to focus on active implementation progress of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) from the national level to the local level. This kickoff session begins with Michael Taylor, JD, FDA's Deputy Commissioner for Foods giving an update on where the FDA is on objectives of FSMA.

Then, Peter Salsbury, FDA Policy Advisor in the Office of Food Safety, will co-present with Mr. Oscar Garrison, Former Partnership for Food Protection Governing Council Representative, expanding upon Mr. Taylor's comments and implementation of FSMA objectives related to the Partnership for Food Protection.

To conclude this session in the "Policy for an Integrated Food Safety System" educational track, NEHA Technical Advisor Scott Holmes facilitates a conversation and questions and answers. After viewing this session, you will have a high-level understanding of the scope and progress of the FSMA implementation. Session sponsored by Prometric and Skillsoft.

July 2015
Michael R. Taylor, JD; Roberta Wagner, JD; Mr. Oscar Garrison
Potential CE Credits: 1.50

These days, every health department is being tasked to increase capacity - capacity to provide customer services, to innovate, and, most importantly, to ensure a healthy population. This session will showcase four real-life case studies where the local health department (some small, some large) committed to leadership, responsible data management, program management, and even operations, eliminated non value-added activities. We'll recount the best (and sometimes the worst) practices found in everyday health agencies so you can concentrate on accountability and overall effectiveness to increase your capacity and make your agency lean and nimble too.

July 2015
Darryl Booth, MBA
Potential CE Credits: 1.00
Additional Topics A to Z: Workforce Development

In times of fiscal austerity we are sometimes confronted with making hard choices about our environmental health programs. This presentation will explore how to trim outdated or "sacred cow" programs and strengthen key programs with high public health benefit. The presentation will include case studies on how general fund tax dollars can be replaced with funds from other sources and on how interns, volunteers, and community partnerships can be used to strengthen priority programs. 

July 2015
Bob Custard, REHS/RS, CP-FS, Lydia Zweimiller, REHS , Michele Howard , Erin May, MPH, CPO
Additional Topics A to Z: Workforce Development

Abstract

We surveyed public health and vector control agencies in the U.S. to identify barriers restricting the implementation of geospatial modeling for West Nile virus (WNV) control. We conducted 18 standardized interviews with public health and vector control agencies in states with the highest cumulative human WNV cases. Agencies were organized by their implementation of geospatial modeling (Initial: Implementation and Support; Internal: Surveillance and Mitigation, and External: Outreach and Communication) and thematic analysis was used to identify barriers and best practices. Initial: Implementation and Support agencies reported funding and educational barriers, while Internal: Surveillance and Mitigation agencies reported surveillance data challenges and mistrust of geospatial modeling as limiting geospatial modeling usage. Agencies involved in External: Outreach and Communication reported policy guidelines and lack of public interest as barriers to using geospatial modeling for WNV control. To overcome these challenges, we identified the use of unified resource programs, local data repositories, and multi-stakeholder taskforces for addressing these challenges to WNV control. The findings from this study can be used to help improve WNV control within the U.S. and might be equally valuable for preemptively mitigating the impacts of emerging and reemerging mosquito-borne diseases.

 

June 2018
June 2018
80.10 | 24-31
Bryan Moy, MPH, PhD, University of California, Los Angeles, Ryan Harrigan, PhD, University of California, Los Angeles, Hilary Godwin, PhD, University of California, Los Angeles
Additional Topics A to Z: Technology

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